COVID-19 Vaccine Information

Vaccine Data

When will I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

COVID-19 vaccine is being distributed to Wisconsin residents in a phased approach. It is important to remember that vaccine supply is limited and vaccinations are targeted to specific groups of people with a higher rish for COVID-19 infection. It will take time to reach all people within each priority population.

Current eligible populations include residents in skilled nursing and long-term care facilities; fire, police and corrections personnel; and adults aged 65 and older.  

Beginning March 1, new groups will be eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. The newly eiligible groups include the following in priority order:

  • Education and child care staff
  • Individuals enrolled in Medicaid long-term care programs
  • Some public-facing essential workers
  • Non-frontline essential health care personnel
  • Facility staff and residents in congregate living settings.

While these groups are eligible on March 1, educators and state-licensed child care providers should anticipate receiving vaccine in March and early April and the remaining groups can plan to be vaccinated in April and May. Vaccine providers should prioritize previously eligible groups before newer groups. This means individuals in newly eligible groups should not expect to get the vaccine right away. It will take time to get to everyone in priority order.

 

There will be no public waitlist created for vaccine distribution. 

 

The Winnebago County Health Department continues announcing more information about local distribution of the vaccine — including the organization of vaccination clinics — as it is available. We are actively working through this process, although it is important to note that these plans are dependent upon the availability of the COVID-19 vaccines. We appreciate your patience as we work together with state and local partners to get the vaccine out as equitably, quickly and safely as possible. 

The Winnebago County Health Department is still currently processing Phase 1A individuals and fire and police personnel. Your healthcare provider or pharmacy may be vaccinating other eligible populations. We encourage you to visit their websites for additional information. Please limit phone calls as many systems are overwhelmed at this time. 
 
Can I get on a vaccine registration list?

The Winnebago County Health Department is not providing a registration list for those outside of Phase 1A at this time. Your healthcare provider or pharmacy may have their own registration list. We encourage you to visit their websites for additional information. Please limit phone calls as many systems are overwhelmed at this time. 

If you feel you are eligible for Phase 1A and have not been offered the vaccine, please check with your employer on their vaccination plan. If you are an independent Phase 1A healthcare provider or you are a representative of a healthcare group with Phase 1A employees and are not affiliated with a vaccine provider, please complete this form and someone will contact you when a vaccine appointment is available.

 

What are the phases of vaccine distribution?

COVID-19 vaccine is being distributed to Wisconsin residents in a phased approach. It is important to remember that vaccine supply is limited and vaccinations are targeted to specific groups of people with a higher risk for COVID-19 infection. It will take time to reach all people within each priority population and phase. There is not a hard stop for each phase. As vaccine supply and the number of vaccinators increase, phases for distribution may overlap. Additional information on vaccine phases and eligibility.

At this time, current eligible populations include:

Next eligible populations starting March 1:

  • Education and child care
  • Individuals enrolled in Medicaid long-term care programs
  • Some public-facing essential workers
  • Non-frontline health care essential personnel
  • Facility staff and residents in congegate living
  • More information on next phase

 
How can I stay informed on vaccine availability?

  • Visit the DHS website
  • Call 2-1-1
  • Sign up for weekly updates from DHS
  • Sign up for daily COVID-19 updates from the Winnebago County Health Department

 

Do I need to wear a mask after I get vaccinated?

Yes, please continue to take precautions after you are vaccinated. Even with vaccine distribution underway, it will still take months to reach community immunity, so we must continue to stay home, wear a mask, physically distance, and practice good hand hygiene. This document provides more information about why pandemic-safe practices are still important post-vaccination.

We are also following CDC’s guidance that a vaccinated person should follow quarantine recommendations if exposed. Having the vaccine would not change quarantine recommendations, regardless of one or two doses or how long it had been since the individual was vaccination. 

 

How do we know that the COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective?

Vaccine approval is driven by science. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers of Disease Control (CDC,) and independent advisors review all vaccine safety and effectiveness data before any vaccine is approved or allowed for distribution. COVID-19 vaccines are going through all the same steps in the trial phases that all vaccines go through to get the full FDA vaccine license and approval.

During emergencies, like the COVID-19 pandemic, the FDA can issue an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to let people get a vaccine before all the trials are complete. The FDA will only give a COVID-19 vaccine an EUA if the current phase III trial data shows the vaccine is safe and has more benefits than risks. Like with all vaccines, after a COVID-19 vaccine is made available to the public, the FDA and CDC will continue to closely monitor the vaccine to help ensure any issues are immediately addressed.

COVID-19 vaccines were tested in large clinical trials to make sure they meet safety standards. Thousands of people were recruited to participate in these trials to see how the vaccines offer protection to people of different ages, races, and ethnicity, as well as those with different medical conditions.

 

What do we know and not know about the vaccine safety for pregnant women, nursing mothers and children?

The data is not yet available to establish the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine when it comes to pregnant women. We do know that pregnancy may increase the risk of illness from COVID-19. Studies are ongoing and more are planned. The recommendations state that if a pregnant woman is part of a recommended group, such as a health care professional, she may choose to be vaccinated and have a conversation with her health care professional about risk and benefits. For women who are breastfeeding, mRNA vaccines are not thought to be a risk to breastfeeding infants and she may choose to be vaccinated as well. More data is needed for children, which is forthcoming. Learn more on CDC’s website.

 

The following websites provide the most current updates on COVID-19 vaccination: 

Annoucements from Gov. Evers and DHS regarding the COVID-19 vaccine:

Additional Resources:

 

HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & VACCINATORS: CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION